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On October 6, 2021, Governor Newsom signed several new bills into law: AB 1391 Adds section 1724 to the Civil Code and makes it unlawful for anyone to sell or sell access to data that was unlawfully obtained.  Similarly, it is unlawful for anyone to buy or use data that they know, or should know, was unlawfully obtained. AB 694 … Read More

In Maag v. United States Bank Nat'l Ass'n, No. 21cv31-H-LL, 2021 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 196307 (S.D. Cal. Oct. 12, 2021), Magistrate Lopez ordered production, subject to protective measures, of class discovery in a data breach case.  The Court addressed the standards for pre-certification class discovery. "The propriety of a class action cannot be determined in some cases without discovery, as… Read More

The CFPB announced that as part of its overall CMS assessment, the CFPB may evaluate the technology controls of an institution and its service providers. Institutions within the scope of the CFPB’s supervision and enforcement authority include both depository institutions and non-depository consumer financial services companies. These institutions operate in a dynamic environment influenced by challenges to profitability, increased focus on… Read More

In In re Sonic Corp. Customer Data Sec. Breach Litig., No. 1:17-md-2807, 2021 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 168504, at *13-16 (N.D. Ohio Sep. 7, 2021), Judge Gwin denied summary judgment to the defendants, who argued that the criminal hacking constituted a supervening cause. Here, Sonic can only prevail by showing that the hackers' criminal acts were independent of Sonic's negligent security… Read More

The California Office of the Attorney General (OAG) is responsible for enforcing the CCPA. The OAG began sending notices of alleged noncompliance to companies on July 1, 2020, the first day CCPA enforcement began. Once a company is notified of alleged noncompliance, it has 30 days to cure that noncompliance.  The OAG identified 27 case examples summarizing the alleged violations… Read More

In Brooks v. Thomson Reuters Corp., No. 21-cv-01418-EMC, 2021 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 154093, at *18-22 (N.D. Cal. Aug. 16, 2021), Judge Chen found that the CCPA did not insulate CLEAR from a claim asserting that CLEAR improperly sold consumer data.  The facts were as follows: Thomson Reuters "aggregates both public and non-public information about millions of people" to create "detailed… Read More

A South Carolina District Court Judge denied Blackbaud's Motion to Dismiss a claim for violation of the California Consumer Privacy Act.  In re Blackbaud_ Inc._ 2021 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 151831 (August 12, 2021). Here, California Plaintiffs adequately allege that Blackbaud qualifies as a "business" under the CCPA. First, they specifically maintain that "Blackbaud and its direct customers determine the purposes… Read More

In In re Ge/Cbps Data Breach Litig., 2021 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 146020, at *16-18 (S.D.N.Y. Aug. 4, 2021), Judge Polk Failla found Article III standing and a negligence case arising out of a data breach.  The facts were as follows: GE contracts with Canon to process documents relating to current and former GE employees and their beneficiaries. (Compl. ¶ 41).… Read More

In In re Sonic Corp. Customer Data Sec. Breach Litig. Fin. Insts., No. 1:17-md-2807, 2021 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 142001, at *5-6 (N.D. Ohio July 30, 2021), Judge Gwin refused to seal some of the data breach investigation from the Sonic data breach hack. In 2017, unidentified third parties accessed Sonic customers' payment card data. The hackers obtained customer payment card… Read More

In Walmart v. Gardiner, Judge Koh - again and for a final time - held that the CCPA was not retroactive. Plaintiff [] argues that the allegation that he discovered his PII for sale in 2019 is “clearly the result of scrivener’s error.” (Opp. at 2.) The Court’s previous Order put Plaintiff on notice that his CCPA claim could not… Read More

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