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Attorneys' Fees

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The district court abused its discretion in setting the hourly rate based solely on the amounts awarded the same attorney in prior decisions in other cases while rejecting his affidavits regarding hourly rates of other attorneys prosecuting similar types of actions. No. 16-16179, 2019 U.S. App. LEXIS 27491 (9th Cir. Sep. 12, 2019) Read More

A trial court may award attorney fees to the prevailing party for a prior appeal without regard to the appellate court’s award or denial of costs on the appeal. Read More

The trial court abused its discretion in denying a prevailing plaintiff attorney fees since the defendant’s initial settlement offer (which the plaintiff rejected) did not comply with section 998. Read More

A provision in a homeowners' association's covenants, conditions, and restrictions that banned "any business or commercial activity" did not prevent a homeowner from maintaining a vineyard on his property, since the CC&R in question should be interpreted to promote its evident purpose of maintaining the residential character of the neighborhood, not so as to impose any added restrictions not needed… Read More

When a trial court applies a substantial negative multiplier to a presumptively accurate lodestar attorney fee amount, the court must clearly explain its case-specific reasons for the percentage reduction, and the trial court abuses its discretion if the reasons for the reduction include tying the fee award to some proportion of the buyer’s damages. Read More

A voluntary association of retirees with about 500 members was entitled to a Private Attorney General Act attorney fee award because the association vindicated important rights of a substantial group of the public and this was just the sort of suit to vindicate rights the recipients couldn't afford to pay for on their own. Read More

Motions to quash a subpoena on an internet service provider may be pursued even after the subpoena has been withdrawn, since there is no assurance in a voluntary withdrawal that the subpoena will not be reissued later, further harassing the same party for his exercise of free speech rights. Read More

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