attorneys

Jason M. Richardson

Associate
jmr@severson.com | (415) 677-5558 Tel | (415) 956-0439 Fax
OFFICE
One Embarcadero Center
Suite 2600
San Francisco
CA 94111

415-398-3344 Tel
415-956-0439 Fax

Areas of Practice

  • Financial Services
    • Financial Services Litigation

Education

  • Carleton College, B.A., 2002
  • University of California, Berkeley, J.D.., 2007

Jason M. Richardson is an associate practicing in Severson & Werson’s Financial Services Litigation Group. Mr. Richardson defends financial institutions against consumer and class actions in state and federal court. His areas of expertise and experience include financial services litigation, as well as contract, intellectual property, product liability, and insurance disputes.

Prior to joining the firm, Mr. Richardson served as a judicial extern to U.S. District court Judge B. Lynn Winmill, as a litigation associate at Squire, Sanders & Dempsey LLP, and as a legislative correspondent for U.S. Congressman Michael M. Honda.

Mr. Richardson earned his law degree from the University of California Berkeley School of Law (Boalt Hall), where he served on the Board of Directors for Boalt Hall’s Moot Court Executive Board, organized the Boalt Hall McBaine Honors Moot Court Competition, worked as research assistant to Professor Paul M. Schwartz, and was a member of the Berkeley Technology Law Journal. Today Mr. Richardson continues his involvement with the Boalt Hall Moot Court program, serving as a coach and advisor to the Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition Team.

Mr. Richardson holds a bachelor’s degree from Carleton College, where he graduated magna cum laude, earned distinction on his senior thesis, and played NCAA intercollegiate soccer for four years.

    Representative Cases

  • California Court of Appeal, First District (San Francisco).  Obtained favorable appellate decision for defendant bank on res judicata grounds.  Appellate court agreed with defendant's position that California Civil Code 473 permitted trial court to grant relief from entry of default on its own motion.  Tah v. US Bank, N.A.